ÆT
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Preposition
Related §§ in Wright's OE Grammar:
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
ÆT
prep. I. with the dative; cum dativo AT, to, before, next, with, in, for, against; apud, juxta, prope, ante, ad, in, contra Sittende æt tollsceamule sitting at the seat of custom, Mt. Bos. 9, 9. Æt fruman worulde at the beginning of the world, Exon. 47a; Th. 161, 7; Gú. 955. Wæs seó treów lufu hát æt heortan the true love was hot at heart, 15 b; Th. 34, 8; Cri. 539. Ge ne cómon æt me ye came not to me, Mt. Bos. 25, 43. Æt selde before the throne, Cd. 228; Th. 306, 12; Sat. 663. Ic áre æt him fínde I may find honour with them, Exon. 67a; Th. 247, 19; Jul. 81. Ic nú æt feáwum wordum secge I now say in few words, Bd. 3, 17; S. 545, 14. Is seó bót gelong eal æt ðé ánum the expiation is all ready with thee alone, Exon. 10a; Th. 10, 16; Cri. 153. Ne mihton hí áwiht æt me ǽftr gewyrcean they might not ever do anything against me, Ps. Th. 128, 1. Ðe him æt blisse beornas habbaþ which men have for their merriment, Exon. 108 b; Th. 414, 4; Rä. 32, 15. 2. because you approach a person or thing when you wish to take something away, as they say in Lancashire, Nottinghamshire, etc. Take this at me, i.e. from me, hence, — Of, from; a, ab, de Anýmaþ ðæt púnd æt hym tollite ab eo talentum, Mt. Bos. 25, 28. Leorniaþ æt me learn by coming near me, learn at, of, or from me; discite a me, Mt. Bos. 11, 29. Æt his sylfes múþe at or from his own mouth. Bd. 3, 27; S. 558, 40. Æt ðam wífe from the woman, Cd. 33; Th. 44, 31; Gen. 717. Ic gebád grynna æt Grendle I endured snares from Grendel, Beo. Th. 1864; B. 930: Ps. Th. 21, 18. 3. the names of places are often put in the dat. pl. governed by æt, the preposition is then, as in Icelandic, not translated, and the noun is read as singular Ðe mon hǽt æt Hǽðum which they call Haddeby; quem vocant Hæthe, Ors. i. 1, § 19; Bos. Eng. 47, note 57. In monasterio, quod situm est in civitate æt Baðum [MS. Bathun], Kmbl. Cod. Dipl, cxciii; vol. i. 237, 1. II. very rarely used with the accusative; cum accusative To, unto, as far as; ad, usque ad Æt sǽ-streámas ad mare, Ps. Th. 79, 11. Æt Ác-leá at Oakley, Chr. 789; Ing. 79, 14. v. Ác-leá. III. sometimes æt is separated from its case Ðonne wile Dryhten sylf dǽda gehýran æt ealra monna gehwám then will the Lord himself hear of the deeds from all sorts of men [ab omnium hominum quocunque], Exon. 99 b; Th. 372, 15; Seel. 93. [O. Sax. at: O. Frs. et, it: O. H. Ger. az: Goth. at: O. Nrs. at.]
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