ÁN
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Noun, Adjective, Pronoun, Numeral
Related §§ in Wright's OE Grammar:
§5,
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
ÁN
I. m. f. n. ONE ; unus, una, unum: gen. m. n. ánes; f. ánre of one; unius: dat. m. n. ánum; f. ánre to one; uni: acc. m. ánne, ǽnne; f. áne, n. án one; unum, unam, unum: instr. m. n. áne; f. ánre with one; uno, unó, uno: pl. nom. acc. m. f. n. áne each, every one, all; unus-quisque, una-quæque, unum-quodque; singuli, æ, a: gen. m. f. n. ánra of every one, all; singulorum, arum, orum: dat. m. f. n. ánum to every one, all; singulis: instr. ánum with all: def. se ána; seó, ðæt áne the one; gen. ðæs, ðære, ðæs ánan of the one: dat. ðam, ðære, ðam ánan to the one: acc. ðone, ða ánan, ðæt án the one: instr. m. n. ðý ánan; f. ðære, ánan with the one; adj. Án of ðám unus ex illis, Mt. Bos. 10, 29. Án wæs on Ispania one was in Spain, Ors. 4, 9; Bos. 92, 19. God geworhte ǽnne mannan, Adam, of láme God created one man, Adam, of earth, Homl. Th. i. 12, 28. He is án God Deus unus est, Mk. Bos. 12, 29. Ðis is án ðara gerǽdnessa this is one of the ordinances, L. Eth. ix. 1; Th. i. 340, 2. II. alone, only, sole, another; solus, alius: with these meanings it is used definitely, and generally written ána, m. and sometimes aina, ánna, ánga, q. v Án God ys gód God alone is good; solus [unus] est bonus, Deus, Mt. Bos. 19, 17. Ðæt ge forlǽton me ánne, and ie ne eom ána ut me solum relinquatis, et non sum solus, Jn. Bos. 16, 32. God ána wát hú his gecynde biþ, wífhádes ðe weres God alone, knows how its sex is, [the sex of] female or male, Exon. 61 a; Th. 223, 6; Ph. 355. Ðæt ge aina [ge á má, Grn.] gebróðra hæfdon quod alium haberetis vos fratrem, Gen. 43, 6. 2. sole, alone of its kind, singular, unique, without an equal; unicus, eximius Án sunu, mǽre meotudes bearn the only Son, illustrious child of the Creator, Exon. 128 a; Th. 492, 7; Rä. 81, 10: Hy. 8, 14; Hy. Grn. ii. 290, 14: Bt. Met. Fox 21, 19, 25, 32; Met. 21, 10, 13, 16. Ðæt wæs án foran eald-gestreóna that was before a singular old treasure, Beo. Th. 2920; B. 1458. Ðæt wæs án cyning, ǽghwæs orleáhtre that was a singular king, faultless in everything, 3775; B. 1885. III. a certain one, some one; quidam; v. sum Án man hæfde twegen suna homo quidam habebat duos filios, Mt. Bos. 21, 28. In this sense it is used as sum in the parallel passage. — Sum man hæfde twegen suna homo quidam habuit duosfilios, Lk. Bos. 15, 11. 2. sometimes, though rarely, án may be used as the English article a, an. It does not, however, appear to be generally used as an indefinite article,ANCOR." num="b0038" title="Page b0038 - ÁN — ANCOR.">but more like the Moes. ain, or the Lat. unus — When a noun was used indefinitely by the Saxons, it was without an article prefixed; as, — þeódríc wæs Cristen Theoderic was a Christian, Bt. 1; Fox 2, 7. 3. in the following examples it seems to be used for the indefinite article a, an Án engel bodade ðám hyrdum ðæs heofonlícan cynínges acennednysse an angel announced to the shepherds the birth of the heavenly king, Homl. Th. i. 38, 3. Ðár beó án mann stande there shall be a man standing, Chr. 1031; Ing. 206, 5; Erl. 162, 7. Ðá stód ðár án Iudeisc wer, ðæs nama wæs Nichodémus then stood there a Jewish man, whose name was Nicodemus, Nicod. 11; Thw. 5, 38. On ánum reste-dæge on a rest-day or sabbath, Lk. Bos. 24, 1: Jn. Bos. 20, 1. Sceollon ǽnne tíman gebídan must wait [abide] a time, L. C. E. 18; Th. i. 370, 18: Ors. 3, 7; Bos. 61, 36. Wirc ðé nú ǽnne arc now make for thee an ark, Gen. 6, 14. Áne lytle hwíle a little while, Bt. 7, 1; Fox 16, 4. Cynric ofslógon ǽnne Bryttiscne cyning Cynric slew a British king, Chr. 508; Ing. 21, 6. IV. each, every one, all; unus-quisque, una-quæque, unum-quodque; singuli, -æ, -a. It is in this sense that it admits of a plural form: nom. acc. pl. m. f. n. áne; gen. m. f. n. ánra; dot. m. f. n. ánum Ánra gehwá, ánra gehwylc every one, or, literally, every one of all. Swelte ánra gehwilc for his ágenum gilte unusquisque pro peccato suo morietur, Deut. 24, 16. Ánes hwæt, Bt. 18, 3; Fox 64, 30, denotes anything, literally 'anything of all,' and is used adverbially for at all, in any degree. One, other, — Án æfter ánum one after another, Jn. Bos. 8, 9: Salm. Kmbl. 771; Sal. 385. To ánum to ánum from one to the other, only; duntaxat. Ðæt án, or for án this one thing, for one thing, only; tantum-modo, Mk. Bos. 5, 36. Hý forbærndon ánne finger, and ánne they burnt off one finger, and then another, Ors. 2, 3; Bos. 42, 15. Ete ǽnne and ǽnné let him eat one and another, one after another, Herb. 1, 20; Lchdm. i. 76, 24. On án in one, continually, ever, Gen. 7, 12: Cd. 140; Th. 175, 9; Gen. 2892. DER. nán [=ne + án n + one] none, no one; nullus [ne-ullus].
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