Constantīnus
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Noun
Gender: Masculine
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
Constantīnus
as Lat. gen. i; dat. o; acc. um; m: also gen. es; dat. e; m. Constantine the Great, Roman Emperor, A. D. 306-337. He is said to have been converted to Christianity, about 312, by the vision of a luminous cross in the sky, on which was the inscription ἐν τούτωι, νίκα by this, conquer. In 330 he removed the seat of empire to Byzantium, which he called after his own name Κωνσταντίνου πόλις , Férde Constantius forþ on Breotone, and Constantínus his sunu, ðam gódan Cásere, his ríce forlét.Wríteþ Eutropius ðæt Constantínus, se Cásere, wǽre on Breotene acenned Constantius died in Britain [A. D. 306], and left his kingdom to his son Constantine, the good emperor. Eutropius writes that the emperor Constantine was born in Britain, Bd. 1, 8; S. 479, 30-32. Constantius, se mildesta man, fór on Bryttanie, and ðǽr gefór; and gesealde his suna ðæt ríce, Constantínuse, ðone he hæfde be Elenan his wife Constantius, the most merciful man, went into Britain, and died there; and gave the empire to Constantine, his son, whom he had by Helena his wife, Ors. 6, 30; Bos. 126, 39-41. Notes and various readings, p. 28, col. 2, § 4, 41h, MS. C. wífe; L. ciefese. Ðá wæs syxte geár Constantínes cáserdómes then was the sixth year of Constantine's imperial power, Elen. Kmbl. 15; El. 8. Ðá sige forgeaf Constantino cyning ælmihtig þmrh his róde then the king Almighty gave victory to Constantine through his cross, 289; El. 145. Mid Constantíne with Constantine, Ors. 6, 31; Bos. 127, 42. Also dat. Constantínuse, 6, 30; Bos. 127, 7, 17, 23. v. Elene.
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