Germania
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Noun
Gender: Feminine
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
Germania
e [ = æ]; f. Germany. The Germania of Alfred extended from the Don on the east to the Rhine and the German Ocean on the west; and from the Danube on the south to the White Sea on the north; it therefore embraced nearly the whole of Europe north of the Rhine and the Danube. Its great extent will be seen by the countries mentioned in the notes from 5 to 39, and in the text of Ors. Bos. pp. 35-40. See also Cluverii Introductionis in universam Geographiam, Libri vi. Amstelædami, 4to. 1729, Lib. iii. Cap. 1. De veteri Germania, pp. 183-186, and the map of Europe, p. 72. Also the very learned work, Cluverii Germania antiqua, Lugd. Batavorum, Elzevir, Fol. 1616: Lib. 1: Cap. xi. De magnitudine Germaniæ antiqux, pp. 94-98, also Lib. iii. Cap. xxxviii. pp. 157-162, and the map, p. 3. Also Cellarii Geographia Antiqua, Cantab. 4to. 1703, pp. 309-313. Warnefried's Hist. Longob. Lib. i. Cap. 1 Nú wille we ymb Europe land-gemǽre reccan, swá mycel swá we hit fyrmest witon.-Fram ðære eá Danais, west óþ Rín ða eá, [seó wylþ of ðæm beorge ðe man Alpis hǽt, and yrnþ ðonne norþ-ryhte on ðæs gársecges earm, ðe ðæt land útanymblíþ, ðe man Bryttannia hǽt] and eft súþ óþ Donua ða eá, [ðære ǽwylme is neáh ðære eá Rínes, and is siððan eást yrnende wið norþan Créca land út on ðone Wendel-Sǽ] and norþ óþ ðone gársecg, ðe man Cwén-Sǽ hǽt: binnan ðǽm syndon manega þeóda; ac hit man hǽt eall, GERMANIA now we will speak, as much as we know, about the boundaries of Europe.-From the river Don, westward to the river Rhine, [which springs from the Alps, and then runs right north into the arm of the ocean, that lies around the country called Britain] and again south to the river Danube, [whose spring is near the river Rhine, and which afterwards runs east by the country north of Greece into the Mediterranean Sea] and north to the ocean, which is called the White Sea; within these are many nations, but it is all called GERMANIA, Ors. 1, 1; Bos. 18, 20-28. Cómon hí of þrím folcum ðám strangestan Germanie ðæt of Seaxum, and of Angle, and of Geátum advenerunt de tribus Germaniæ populis fortioribus, id est Saxonibus, Anglis, Jutis, Bd. 1, 15; S. 483, 20.
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