holm
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Noun
Gender: Masculine
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
holm
es; m. A mound, hill, rising ground; but in this sense, which belongs to the word in the Old Saxon, it is not found in English. I. Its most common use in the latter, in the poetry, is in reference to water with the meaning wave, ocean, water, sea Freá engla héht wesan wæter gemǽne ðá stód hraðe holm under heofonum síd ætsomne the lord of angels bade the waters be together, then quickly stood ocean under heaven far-stretching continuously, Cd. 8; Th. 10, 23; Gen. 161. Holm the [Red] sea, 157; Th. 195, 30; Exod. 284: 166; Th. 206, 9; Exod. 449. Holm the water of the deluge, 71; Th. 86, 15; Gen. 1431. Holm storme weól, Beo. Th. 2267; B. 1131. Holm heolfre weóll [of the lake where Grendel dwelt ], 4282; B. 2137: 3189; B. 1592. Wíde rád ofer holmes hrincg hof séleste [of the ark ], Cd. 69; Th. 84, 5; Gen. 1393. Eów is holmes hlæst and heofonfuglas and wildu deór on geweald geseald the fishes of the sea, the fowls of the air, and the beasts of the earth are delivered into your hand, 74; Th. 91, 20; Gen. 1515. Wið holme foldan sceldun guarded land against sea, Exon. 22 a; Th. 61, 4; Cri. 979. On holme, 97 a; Th. 363, 9; Wal. 51: Beo. Th. 1090; B. 543: 2875; B. 1435. Æt holme by the sea, 3832; B. 1914. Sealt wæter hreóh mé holme besencte tempestas demersit me, Ps. Th. 68, 2. Ðá wæs heofonweardes gást ofer holm boren the spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters, Cd. 6; Th. 8, 7; Gen. 121. Léton holm beran they let the sea bear him, Beo. Th. 96; B. 48. Ofer wídne holm, Exon. 79 a; Th. 296, 23; Crä. 55. Ofer heánne holm, Elen. Kmbl. 1962; El. 983: Cd. 213; Th. 266, 4; Sat. 17: Exon. 77 b; Th. 291, 14; Wand. 82. Ðá ic on holm gestáh when I embarked, Beo. Th. 1269; B. 632: Andr. Kmbl. 858; An. 429. Heá holmas deep waters, Exon. 54 b; Th. 193, 17; Az. 123. Holmas dǽlde waldend úre God divided the waters, Cd. 8; Th. 9, 24; Gen. 146: Exon. 93 a; Th. 349, 31; Sch. 54. Hider ofer holmas hither over the waves, Beo. Th. 485; B. 240. Windge holmas stormy seas, Exon. 20 a; Th. 53, 26; Cri. 856. Holma begang the way across the waters, Ps. Th. 138, 18: Andr. Kmbl. 390; An. 195: Bt. Met. Fox 11, 69; Met. 11, 30. Holma geþring, Beo. Th. 4271; B. 2132. Holma gelagu, Exon. 82 a; Th. 309, 28; Seef. 64. II. From the Scandinavian hólmr an islet especially in a bay, creek, lake, or river, it is used in English with the meaning land rising from the water, an island in a river, etc., holm [in local names] Ðý ilcan geáre wæs ðæt gefeoht æt ðam Holme Cantwara and ðara Deniscra, Chr. 902; Th. 180, col. 2. Hér fór Cnut Cyng tó Denmearcon mid scipon tó ðam holme æt eá ðære hálgan, 1025; Erl. 163, 7. [Laym. holm: Prompt. Parv. holm, place besydone a water hulmus; of a sonde yn the see bitalassum vel hulmus. v. p. 243, note 2, and 244, note 2.] DER. sǽ-, wǽg-holm.
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