swógan
Morphological Analysis
Wordclass: Verb
Verb Class: Strong
Related §§ in Wright's OE Grammar:
In the OE text, the length is:indicated by acute accentsindicated by macronsnot indicated.
swógan
p. sweóg; pp. swógen. I. to make a sound, move with noise, rush, roar (of wind, water, flame) Swógaþ windas, bláwaþ brecende bearhtma mǽste, Exon. Th. 59, 10; Cri. 950. Frætwe míne (a swan ) swógaþ hlúde, 390, 7; Rä. 8, 7. Drihten lét willeburnan on woruld þringan, égorstreámas swógan, Cd. Th. 83, 5; Gen. 1375. Fýr swógende, 154, 17; Gen. 2557. Swógende lég, Beo. Th. 6282; B. 3145. Swógende strepente, Wrt. Voc. ii. 74, 72. Ðǽm swógendum, hleóðregendum argutis, 5, 36: 86, 74. II. fig. to move with violence, enter with force, invade. v. in-swógenness Ðæt nǽnig bisceop óþres bisceopscíre on swóge ut nullus episcoporum parochiam alterius invadat, Bd. 4, 5; S. 572, 32. [Þe soun of our souerayn þen swey in his ere, Allit. Pms. 104, 429. Cf. the noun in Mid. E. swoughe, swoghe = noise, e. g. of the see he herde a swoghe (Halliwel's Dict. q. v.), modern sough of the wind. But both verb and noun are used in the sense of swoon; for the verb v. geswógen, and as later instances swowinde, A. R. 288, 25; he feol iswowen (-swoȝe, 2nd MS.), Laym. 3074: for the noun see Stratmann and Halliwell. O. Sax. swógan Swógan quam engil, faran an feðerhamon, Hél. 5798.] v. á-, ofer-, þurh-swógan; swégan.
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